Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: June 19, 2019

We’ve decided it would be better to post this blog every two weeks so we can pack more news in to one sitting! The next issue will be on July 3.

Facebook Unveils Libra Cryptocurrency, Targeting 1.7 Billion Unbanked

Facebook is going all in with crypto and launching a new token: Libra. It’s interesting that you won’t need a Facebook account to use Libra. The Libra Association will be the governing body and Facebook will be just one equal member of the Association, along with others like Union Square Ventures.

Gmail is not a telecommunications service

The German government has lost in court against Google. They were trying to apply a law meant for telcos to Gmail. The European Court of Justice has rejected this argument.

Some day 😅

See you in two weeks! 🙂

Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: June 12, 2019

Internet Trends 2019 (www.bondcap.com)

Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Reports are a classic in the industry. I found the 2019 web version hard to navigate so I’m posting a link to the PDF.

Salesforce is Acquiring Tableau for $15.7B (meltano.com)

Another week, another big acquisition in the analytics and business intelligence space. But I’m not sure it’ll be such a great fit, with Tableau mostly being an on-premises tool while Salesforce is the standard-bearer for all things cloud and SaaS.

Google To Buy Data Firm Looker For $2.6 Billion To Boost Cloud Offerings (www.forbes.com)

“The combination of Google Cloud and Looker will enable customers to harness data in new ways to drive their digital transformation,” Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian, said in a statement.

Identity is dead (www.constellationr.com)

What’s the difference between ‘digital identity’ and ‘real life identity’?

Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: June 5, 2019

Get G Suite adoption and collaboration insights with Work Insights, now generally available (gsuiteupdates.googleblog.com)

Work Insights, Google’s collaboration analytics tool for G Suite Enterprise customers, just left beta. Interestingly, it also shows data about Microsoft Office usage.

Apple introduces ‘Sign in with Apple’ to help protect your privacy (techcrunch.com)

More sign in options are always welcome, but will Apple Sign In work for people without iPhones? Also, according to the App Store review guidelines update, Sign In with Apple will be required for any iOS app with a single-sign in button.

G Suite Migrate beta now supports migrations from Box (gsuiteupdates.googleblog.com)

Google is improving G Suite Migrate, a tool launched a few months ago to help admins plan migration projects. It is built on technology from Google Cloud’s AppBridge acquisition in 2017.

Open Up Vs Break Up (avc.com)

Some politicians, like Senator Warren, advocate breaking up Google and other large tech companies (“big tech”). Personally, I agree with Fred Wilson when he says that that “feels like a very 19th/20th century move”. However, I’m not sure the best solution is to force Twitter to keep their API open and free. Ideally, it should be very easy to start a company and compete with Twitter.

BBM is shutting down today, here’s five solid alternatives (9to5google.com)

“BBM, or Blackberry Messenger, (…) was massive in the mid-2000s.” “It finally made the jump from Blackberry devices to iOS and Android way back in 2013 but has struggled to gain any real traction.”

Google Drive limiting third-party access to user data as part of Project Strobe (9to5google.com)

“Similar to Gmail last October, Google is locking down what apps can access user data and verifying the authenticity of those that do.”

The end of mobile (www.ben-evans.com)

“That’s where we are now – we try to work out what it means that almost everyone has a phone or a smartphone”

Many more insightful tweets in the thread. This makes me think that our own experience using Slack at ShuttleCloud is maybe so good because we’re small. I’ve heard that it gets chaotic in bigger companies. Also, short voice messages apps and Discord seem to be winning more business users.

Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: May 29, 2019

Google’s Messages app surpasses 500 million Play Store installs

From the article: “This number is significant because Google doesn’t require phone makers to pre-install this app”.

Google’s Duplex Uses A.I. to Mimic Humans (Sometimes)

15% of all Google Duplex calls require human intervention and 25% actually start with a human caller, so I find it amazing that Google is offering this service for free. Maybe this is Google’s way to train their AI?

WhatsApp users will start seeing in-app ads within ‘Status’ feature from 2020

Latest WhatsApp beta adds Share to Facebook, QR code contact adding features

WhatsApp QR code ‘add contact’ functionality could be a real timesaver for adding new contacts.

Decentralized Domain Registry Raises $4 Million From Draper, Boost VC

In my opinion, the domain name system is an important part of the identity problem online. Unstoppable Domains could be a solution, a “safe haven for toxic content or illegal use cases” or… both 🙂

Managing communication tools in distributed companies

This is a very interesting practical example of how a mid size company has designed its internal collaboration/communication infrastructure. (Full disclosure: ShuttleCloud is a proud TechStars grad and they remain one of our top clients ☺️)

First stable Tor Browser build now available on Android

It’s great to see that this important privacy tool is now officially available in Android.

The Most Expensive Lesson Of My Life: Details of SIM port hack

This type of hack is becoming more frequent. Telecom companies need to strengthen their security protocols against social engineering, but it also shows the importance of identity management online.

The Tech My Toddler Will Never Know: Six Gadgets Headed for the Graveyard

From the article: “Sorry, email still exists in the future.”

Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: May 15 2019

Android Pie hits 10% adoption ahead of schedule, 2.5 billion Android devices now in the wild

5 billion Android devices… that’s a lot!

Slack is adding email conversations and calendar integrations.

Email is not going away anytime soon and it looks like Slack wants to play nice with it.

The 8-Figure Email Newsletter — Morning Brew

We’ve heard great things about Morning Brew for advertisement purposes and it’s interesting to see that an email newsletter can still be a great business in 2019.

Microsoft Launches Decentralized Identity Tool on Bitcoin Blockchain

Identity online is a hard problem both for businesses and consumers and it’s interesting to see Microsoft try to tackle it with a bitcoin-based solution.

Google Pay adds Gmail importing for automatically adding tickets, loyalty cards from your inbox

Google keeps working hard on making Gmail be the future of email.

Latest WhatsApp beta adds Vacation Mode that allows you to ignore, fully mute archived chats

WhatsApp can be intrusive and these are probably going to be welcome features.

Email & Collaboration Industry Weekly: May 22, 2019

Why WhatsApp Will Never Be Secure

Does WhatsApp’s end-to-end encryption guarantee privacy and security? This is an interesting post by the founder of Telegram, who might be biased of course.

Google opens Safety Engineering Center in Munich to lead global privacy initiatives

German engineers are very privacy-focused, so this makes a lot of sense and we hope it means that Google will get very strong privacy controls.

Report: Google to cease business w/ Huawei, pull Play Store, Google apps, Android updates

According to the report, future Huawei devices won’t have access to any Google services, including Play Store.


Google’s former Global Lead of Privacy Technology says there was no backdoor for the NSA.

Inside Google’s Civil War

“Activists inside Google are relying on traditional labor organizing tactics but their demands are not just the typical wage or benefits ask”. “It’s about much more than a paycheck… they want a say in and control over the products they build.”

Google Nest announces they will stop supporting Works with Nest

Best Enterprise Email Providers in 2019

Email is today an essential tool for both internal and external communication in companies of all sizes. Whether you are a freelancer or operate a 100,000-employee company, you need a good email provider. Here, we present you with the top email providers for enterprise and business users in 2019.

Need to migrate between providers? ShuttleCloud is the leading email migration provider, and can help you seamlessly copy all your emails onto your new provider.

1. G Suite by Google

Gmail is widely recognized as the undisputed champion in consumer email. But Gmail, as a product, is also used it in organizations of all sizes, from one-person companies to big banks with thousands of employees.

G Suite packs Gmail, Google Drive (with Spreadsheets, Docs, file storage and sharing, and more), Google Calendar and many more products and features — all under your own company’s domain, white-label branding, and an extensive array of management settings and features for advanced enterprise usage.

Pricing starts at US $ 6 / month / account for the Basic plan. Depending on your requirements, especially regarding data retention and other advanced features, you may need the Business plan, which starts at US $ 12 / month / account.

Whether you need a certified G Suite partner to ensure a smooth operation within G Suite, or are looking for help migrating emails from any provider into G Suite, ShuttleCloud has a solution for you.

2. Office 365

Office 365 is the answer to G Suite by Microsoft. While the email product is not as advanced as Google’s offering, its strong selling point is the inclusion of the quintessential Microsoft Office suite —including Word, Excel and more— in most of the plans. In addition to the licenses for desktop software, Office 365 also works with Exchange access (useful if you live and breathe Outlook!), and comes with browser-based versions of Excel and Word, as well as OneDrive, for enhanced collaboration, file storage and sharing.

Pricing starts at US $ 150 / year / account (with a 1-year commitment, or $ 15 / month without commitment). While the pricing is not as competitive as Google’s, Office 365 is a great option if you are coming from a hosted or in-house Exchange solution and need an easy migration path to the cloud, or if you rely heavily on Microsoft Office licenses for desktop software and want to leverage this new licensing model.

3. Zoho Mail

If you are looking for the most affordable solution that will enable you to send and receive email with your own domain, then Zoho Mail, which starts at US $ 12 / year / account, is undoubtedly the most affordable option in the market. Zoho Mail also includes Contacts, Calendar, Notes, Tasks and Bookmarks.

However, unlike with Office 365 and G Suite, office automation is not included in the most basic package—but you can switch to Zoho Workplace, including email and productivity tools, for only US $ 36 / year / account (or US $ 4 / month / account).

4. FastMail for Business

If you’re looking for only contacts, calendar and email in a hosted cloud —with no productivity suites and no cloud-storage offerings alongside—, and value a strong focus on privacy and security, then FastMail is a good choice for you. Starts at $ 50 / year / account (or $ 5 / month / account) for an account with a custom domain.

5. ONLYOFFICE

While its offering is heavily focused on office productivity, including very advanced Word, Excel and PowerPoint browser-based competitors, ONLYOFFICE’s cloud-based offering also includes email with your own domain. Price varies depending on the number of accounts and your commitment, however, you can expect to pay around US $ 36 / year / account, and includes email, document management, cloud-based office suite, calendar, CRM and more.

Breve historia de la arroba (@)

La arroba era una medida de peso y volumen en la Edad Media. En Castilla equivalía a 30 libras y en Aragón a 36, es decir, a la cuarta parte de un quintal en ambos reinos. Un quintal, por su parte, valía unos 46 kgs. Luego de la Revolución Francesa se establecería el quintal métrico, dándole un valor de cien kgs. La arroba se identificó posteriormente con el símbolo @, parece que como una derivación de la antigua medida griega llamada ánfora. La fecha tal vez más antigua de que tenemos constancia es la que aparece en un documento de un mercader que envió su mercancía de Sevilla a Roma el año 1536. En su documento de entrega hizo constar que “una @ de vino, que es la treceava parte de un barril¸ vale setenta u ochenta ducados”. Alguien ha encontrado que la fecha pudo ser anterior: en 1448.

Sea de ello lo que fuere, tal símbolo casi olvidado en los anales de los reinos antiguos ha vuelto a la arena desde que Ray Tomlinson, el programador norteamericano que puso en funcionamiento el primer sistema de correo electrónico, comprendiendo que no debía utilizar ningún carácter que estuviera presente en los nombres de las personas o las empresas, dio en hacer uso de la @ de arroba. Así apareció la primera dirección de correo electrónico: tomlinson@bbn-tenexa.

Tomlinson dio el primer paso el año 1971. Él no pudo imaginar entonces lo que vendría después. Ahora sabemos que hace cuatro años, el 2015, había más de dos mil seiscientos millones (2.600.000.000) de direcciones de correo electrónico, entre particulares y empresas, cada una de las cuales constaba de una @ entre el término que identifica al usuario y el host servidor. Se pensaba entonces que el número se incrementaría en unos trescientos mil (300.000) al año, de manera que en este año 2019 habría llegado a tres mil setecientos millones (3.700.000.000), pero esta cifra se superó con creces hace dos años, en el 2017, cuando sobrepasó los cuatro mil millones (4.000.000.000), un número superior a la mitad de la población del planeta, que ronda los siete mil seiscientos millones (7.600.000.000). El flujo diario de mensajes entre esos usuarios del correo electrónico superaba entonces los doscientos sesenta mil millones (260.000.000.000), que pasaron a más de doscientos ochenta mil millones (280.000.000.000) el año pasado (2018) y seguramente superarán los trescientos mil millones este año 2019.

Origen etimológico del email

Email es abreviación de electronic mail, que significa correo electrónico.

La palabra correo procede del latín currere, que significa correr. De ella proceden otras como corsocorsariodiscurrirconcurrirrecorrersocorrer, etc., y está emparentada de cerca con otras más, como carrocargar y carroza. Todas ellas hacen referencia a un sujeto que ejecuta una acción. El correo era el hombre que, primero a pie y luego a caballo o en algún carruaje, llevaba una misiva de una persona a otra.

Un correo renombrado que la historia recuerda es el soldado ateniense de nombre Filípides que el año 490 a. C. corrió sin descansar 40 kilómetros y 195 metros, la distancia que separa a Maratón de Atenas, logrando pronunciar las palabras “¡Nike, NikeNike! (“¡Victoria, Victoria, Victoria!”)justo antes de caer exhausto y morir. La guerra había sido declarada a los griegos por el Imperio Persa.

Otro fue Miguel Strogoff, el correo del Zar de Rusia, que hubo de recorrer unas dos mil quinientas verstas, unos dos mil seiscientos sesenta kilómetros, para ir de Moscú a Irkutsk, capital de la Siberia Oriental. Por el camino tuvo tiempo de declarar su amor a una mujer, visitar a su madre, sufrir torturas, etc. La gesta fue novelada por Julio Verne.

Recorrido de Strogoff

Luego se entendió que el correo era el contenido del mensaje, que ahora viaja a la velocidad de la luz sin necesidad de mensajeros que lo lleven de un lugar a otro.

Hoy no es posible declarar la guerra ni el amor. No hay tiempo.

Top free email services for 2018

Email is currently an essential tool to communicate, both in the corporate and personal spheres. In our day-to-day lives we now send and receive an abundance of emails. Although all free email providers deliver this basic service, the truth is that each of them has different characteristics.

At ShuttleCloud we are experts in the migration of information between them. In fact, our clients include more than 200 different email providers. Here we take a look at the characteristics of the most popular free email services:

1. Gmail. With its 1.2 billion users, Gmail is the world’s leading email service. Blocking suspicious attachments for security reasons, the ability to send files up to 25 megabytes in each message (if exceeded, a link is sent to Drive), the automatic translation of messages, smart responses, the organisation of emails into folders, labels, and access to tools as complete as Drive, Calendar and Maps are some of its main advantages. However, free accounts have limited storage space (the maximum is 15 gigabytes) and there is also a daily limit for sending messages (500 messages or the same email sent to more than 500 recipients, if a Google group is not created).

2. Outlook Mail. Microsoft’s email service has recently been integrating many of the functions boasted by Gmail. A simple and intuitive graphical interface (for example, at the top there is a broom icon, to easily clean boxes), the classification of messages by colour, and the application of marks, warnings and colours are some of its advantages. Outlook users also have a space limit with a free account (15 gigas), and there are restrictions when sending mass emails. Another disadvantage that some users may find is that to attach a file one must take two steps (selecting whether you want to share it as a link or as a copy).

3. Yahoo Mail. Although Yahoo email has declined in popularity over the years, the fact is that it has many interesting features for users of its free service. Its storage space is huge (1,000 gigas), allows users to recover emails sent in the previous seven days, even if they appear as deleted, and allows for the creation of disposable addresses that function temporarily, to provide greater control over privacy and spam. However, the labelling system is not as flexible as Gmail’s, nor does it have some extra features that would facilitate the user’s experience.

4. ProtonMail. Users who are more concerned about their privacy also have some email services that attach the utmost importance to this feature. This is the case of ProtonMail, an open source project developed by entrepreneurs from the CERN and MIT. Its most salient feature is its end-to-end encryption, which guarantees that nobody can read the content of the messages. In its free version it is not compatible with other email clients that support IMAP and SMTP protocols, and it only allows one to store 500 MB of encrypted content, which is definitely a drawback.

5. iCloud Mail. Although the most logical thing is for users of Apple devices to create their accounts using this service to send emails through the Mail app of their iOS device or Mac, it can also be accessed via Microsoft Outlook. Although its design is one of its strong points, one of its limitations is its storage space: only 5 gigabytes. 6. Zoho Mail. In addition to allowing us to send email, Zoho Mail, a business-oriented service, integrates with a series of its own apps that make it possible to create and edit documents and spread sheets. Although its pay version, particularly, features a series of strengths, the free version also has its upsides: it makes it possible to create accounts for 25 employees, each one with 5 gigabytes of storage.   

7. GMX Mail. Users who require a lot of space to store their messages for decades may opt for another alternative: GMX offers unlimited storage capacity and also allows you to send very large attachments, up to 50 gigabytes. The interface is simple, although its functions cannot be compared to those of the most popular services.

8. Mail.com. Another of the least-known free email services is Mail.com. It offers much less storage space than others (2 gigabytes), but allows one to send files of up to 50 megabytes in a single message. There is also an integrated online calendar to schedule meetings.

9. Tutanota. If a user is concerned about his security, this is another of the email services that can come in very handy, as it also uses end-to-end encryption and, like Zoho, is open source. The service is very simple, although its free storage capacity is weak: only 1 gigabyte.

10. Yandex Mail. Created by the Russian company of the same name, this email service is also another alternative to the most popular options. It stands out for its interface, similar to Gmail’s and very easy to use, and it offers almost all the tools one might need: filters, tasks, keyboard shortcuts, the capacity to customise the interface… However, its storage space is less than that of other services (10 gigas).